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Tuesday, April 28, 2020 | History

6 edition of Union Army Camp Cooking (Patricia B. Mitchell Foodways Publications) found in the catalog.

Union Army Camp Cooking (Patricia B. Mitchell Foodways Publications)

Patricia B. Mitchell

Union Army Camp Cooking (Patricia B. Mitchell Foodways Publications)

  • 221 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Mitchells .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States,
  • History,
  • Civil War, 1861-1865,
  • Cooking,
  • United States.,
  • Messes,
  • Armed Forces,
  • Army,
  • 19th century,
  • Cookery, Military

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8356244M
    ISBN 100925117412
    ISBN 109780925117410
    OCLC/WorldCa34837513

    Whether you love patio cooking, tailgating, barbecuing or camping, you will become the master chef after using the Outdoor Cooking Guide. This book is filled with over recipes that will help you cook like a pro. Several award winning recipes are included. Author Marla Rawlings has a background full of outdoor cooking experience and is also the author of Beginner’s Guide to 3/5(1).


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Union Army Camp Cooking (Patricia B. Mitchell Foodways Publications) by Patricia B. Mitchell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Union Army Camp Cooking: [Mitchell, Patricia B.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Union Army Camp Cooking: /5(6). Union Army Camp Cooking book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5(1).

Union Army Camp Cooking ( - ) Unknown Binding – January Union Army Camp Cooking book, out of 5 stars 6 ratings. See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Kindle "Please retry" $ — /5(6). This description and many other excerpts from diaries, journals, and letters of Union Army soldiers in the American Civil War Union Army Camp Cooking book Union Army Camp Cooking by Patricia B.

Mitchell an especially informative and fascinating-to-read book. – Union Officer, October The following Union army recipe comes from Camp Fires and Camp Cooking; or Culinary Hints for the Soldier by Captain Sanderson. It s a basic recipe (in those days.

The Union army simply did not have the infrastructure to adequately supply and feed a two million man force. After the Union’s first big defeat at Bull Run, however, James Sanderson, a member of the United States Sanitary commission, approached the War Office with a plan.

He wanted to train men in each company in the art of basic cooking. Camp followers are civilians who follow armies. There are two common types of camp followers; first, the wives and children of soldiers, who follow their spouse or parent's army from place to place; the second type of camp followers have historically been informal army service providers, servicing the needs of encamped soldiers, in particular selling goods or services that the.

A private in the Union army made $13 a month, while a three star general made over $ a month. Soldiers in the Confederate army made less with privates earning $11 a month. Payments were slow and irregular, however, with soldiers sometimes waiting over 6 months to get paid.

Northern rations. According to Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, written by a U.S. Army officer from the South before the war, the rations for a soldier during this time usually included. 20 oz. pork or beef (Beef was either fresh or salted, and pork was always salted.); 12 oz. hard bread in Union Army Camp Cooking book or garrison or 16 oz.

of hard bread at sea, on campaign, or on the march. US Army Cookbooks and Food Service Manuals. Books are listed by date. All manuals were produced by the U.S. War Department or the Department of the Army (after ), unless noted. Sanderson, Capt. James M. Camp Fires and Camp Cooking.

Washington: GPO, Subsistence Dept. Notes on Canned Goods. Civil War Food Hardtack. Union soldiers also received a hard, unsavory cracker-like biscuit that the soldiers dubbed hardtack while Confederate soldiers were lucky if they received a good supply of cornmeal.

During battles and when food was scarce a Union soldier’s primary source of substance often came from hardtack. Hardtack is basically bread, it’s three inches long and. The Union army mostly used the wedge tent to live in, a six-foot length of canvas draped over a pole and staked to the ground at the sides, with flaps that closed over each end.

The wedge tent also saw use in the South, but when canvas became scarce, many soldiers were forced to make "open-air" beds by piling leaves or straw between two logs. Confederate Camp Cooking by Patricia B.

Mitchell revision of the first edition (), describing the rations and culinary improvisations of the Southern soldier. 33 authentic and commemorative recipes. 52 research notes, 37 pages. x inches. Camp Douglas, in Chicago, Illinois, sometimes described as "The North's Andersonville," was one of the largest Union Army prisoner-of-war camps for Confederate soldiers taken prisoner during the American Civil south of the city on the prairie, it was also used as a training and detention camp for Union soldiers.

The Union Army first used the camp in as an Controlled by: Union Army. This authentic handbook provides a wealth of revealing information on life in the Union Army during the Civil War. Cited regulations include details of military discipline, rank and command, care and armament of fortifications, and dozens of other topics.

A must for serious Civil War historians, buffs, and battle scene reenactors. Cooking on camp should be quick, easy and with as little washing up as possible.

All sets of ingredients in this Cook Book are based on a Patrol of 8 scouts and recipes can be easily chopped and changed to accommodate dietary requirements, allergies and fussy eaters. For breakfast and lunch on camp, time is usually the most important factor.

The Army and other DOD Service Departments operate camp grounds and RV sites throughout the U.S. on military installations and Recreation Areas. For information on the location of these facilities, and amenities, please click the map below.

Florence Nightingale was commissioned by the Virginia Army to write "Cooking by Troops, for Camp and Hospital" during the American Civil War.

Her book provided recipes to feed soldiers at a time with limited commissary supplies, and offered advice on nutritious foods and broths to administer to injured soldiers in army hospital camps. A truly interesting historical Author: Florence Nightingale.

Berdan's Sharpshooter History. During the Civil War there were two green uniformed regiments in service of the Union Army. These were the First and Second Regiments of United States Sharpshooters, very much celebrated and publicized units in their time, though almost completely forgotten today.

Considering that World War One was going on years ago, this is an interesting book for those interested in the US Army of the period. Going through some of the unit reports of World War 1, recipes from this little book appear.

Army coffee is still pretty basic. Cleaning the pot once a year or so does help the taste : Civil War tents came in many different shapes and sizes. Civil War tents were made out of canvas.

At the start of the Civil War Union soldiers often used the Sibley tent. This tent was invented in by Henry Sibley a West Point graduate who explored out west. The design was inspired by Native American teepees. Soldier's Food during the Civil War.

Prev Next the food soldiers received has been the source of more stories than any other aspect of army life. The Union soldier received a variety of edibles.

The food issue, or ration, was usually meant to last three days while on active campaign and was based on the general staples of meat and bread. Camp Cooking - Great albumen photograph of a black soldier wearing a four button sack coat, while tending to camp duties.

The photograph bears an ink inscription on the reverse entitle, "Camp Cooking". The image is marked The War for the Union, Photographic History by John. Taylor of Hartford, Conn. Inventory Number: CDV Store. Lot of International Resources Houses Price Telegraph Co Church Store Christmas $ Quick Check NJ convenience Store Advertisement matches food stores match book $ Hugga Bunch Video Store Poster Original UNUSED $ Vintage Bunny Rabbit Ben Franklin Store 8" Tan & Pink w/Floppy Ears Jointed.

The cooking manual used by the US Army in World War One, so a very valuable resource for any student of that period. Reading some of the post-war reports, this manual was well used. The US Army was probably the best-fed army in World War One, and definitely the best-fed army in World War :   I purchased this book, "Confederate Camp Cooking" by Patricia B.

Mitchell at the Visitor Center gift shop at the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Park. According to the author, the purpose of this book is to explore the lifestyle of the Southern soldier, with a special emphasis on the food he ate ("such as it was, and what there was of it").

Camp Fires and Camp Cooking; or, Culinary Hints for the Soldier, etc. Preview this book Otherwise, it's a fascinating look at feeding the Union troops in the field during the US Civil War.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate. weird. Selected pages. Page i. Title Page/5(3). military. Our camp looks just like a town.”3 Many camps were organized with proper streets of tents for officers and enlisted men, kitchens, sutlers, stockade, and latrines.

On the open fields around the camp the soldiers drilled and drilled and drilled. J.W. Bartmess, a recruit, wrote from Camp Carrington on Nov. 26, ,File Size: KB.

The Confederate government adopted the official US Army ration at the start of the war, although by the spring of they had the reduce it. According to army regulations for camp rations, a Union soldier was entitled to receive daily 12 oz of pork or bacon or 1 lb.

4 oz of fresh or salt beef; 1 lb. 6 oz of soft bread or flour, 1 lb. of hard. Camp Fires of the Boys in Gray: Civil War History Discussion: 5: Campfires & Battlefields: Non-Fiction History of the Civil War: 3: Reminiscence of the Camp Fires: Reenactors Forum - Join, Drill, See the Elephant: 2:   The Army of Northern Virginia’s ability to safely cross the Potomac with the Union army in pursuit depended in large part on camp slaves, who cared for.

Camp Chef is your source for the best camping grills, stoves, smokers, and everything outdoor cooking. Let us show you a better way to cook outdoors. Due to COVID precautionary measures, we are seeing longer customer service wait times & light shipping delays. The Union Army in the Civil War had a distinct advantage over the Confederacy when it came to equipment.

Union canteens were also superior to most Confederate-made canteens. knife, fork, and spoon. Some carried small frying pans or half of an old canteen for cooking their salt pork and hardtack. As with everything else, a large variety.

This book — originally a series of essays — was written by a Union colonel from New England, in charge of black troops training off the coast of the Carolinas.

It offers a refreshing portrait of life in the Union Army as the narrator captures the raw humor that develops among the men in combat. By the end of the war, an estimatedto one million slaves had fled to Union lines, some ,–, of whom would serve as noncombatant laborers, more than twice the number of enslaved men who became soldiers in the Union army.

While black laborers played a vital role in both armies, the debate over whether they should be used at Cited by: 1. The Union Army in the American Civil War had a standard ration: roughly three-quarters of a pound of meat, a pound of flour or cornmeal, some kind of vegetable and vinegar and molasses.

“If you. Regiment after regiment was divided into camps and the men drilled incessantly to prepare for the ordeal of battle. The daily camp routine was described in the following letter a Connecticut soldier, Philip W. Hudson, wrote to his father on 17 May Illustration: Union soldier drawing in front of his tent, by C.

Reed and Louis K. Harlow. Pots, pans, and other cooking tools may be available to borrow from Army Community Service (ACS). If you must purchase your own cooking tools and devices, research and shop for the best quality at an affordable price. The next few pages contain an illustrative guide to some of the helpful and common cooking devices and Size: 1MB.

American popular culture often depicts enslaved African-Americans during the Civil War as either remaining loyally on plantations or running away to join the. The author of commercial camp food service guidebooks and recipe books, magazine and newspaper articles. An all-agency camp food service consultant.

A high school English and Culinary Arts teacher. A speaker and presenter at local, regional, and national conferences on various camp food service and commercial food safety topics. Line a pie pan with an uncooked pie crust.

Fill with sliced apples, nutmeg, cinnamon, and molasses. Cover with a lattice crust and bake at degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Mary Todd Lincoln’s White Cake. In the midst of all the bloodshed, life went on at the White House. Abraham Lincoln’s wife, Mary Todd, was a woman who was raised in.Whose "Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops" provided a first-person account of the sort of laundering, cooking, and nursing which many female contrabands provided for the Union army?Army Reserve Culinary Arts Program.

likes. The US Army Reserve Culinary Arts Program is designed to increase awareness of the culinary arts program in the US Army Reserve.5/5.